Tag Archives: Trump and Christianity

Hard-hitting article in HuffPo: “White Evangelicals Will Never Make America Great Again.” The title says it all, but here are a few quotable passages…

This “great” America ostracizes the marginalized, seeks profits over people on a global scale and uses inflammatory rhetoric to justify its violence. It is a version of America where Muslims are not allowed entry, where buying a wedding cake cannot be a free act for LGBTQ people, where children are separated from their parents and put in cages and all the while a real-estate investor-leader of the free world threatens his nuclear power with impunity…

It seems that the more immoral Trump’s behavior, the more evangelicals scramble to his defense, throwing the Bible at his scandals to defend their political savior. From defending the caging of children at the border by quoting Romans, to using the Scriptures to smooth over an affair with a porn star, white evangelical politicians are maintaining that into order to make America great again, we must in effect make America Christian, leaning on the myths that the United States was ever good, virtuous and committed to the teachings of Jesus.

In seeking to be the light of the world through moral control, Christians have succeeded only in giving power to the whites of the world while perpetuating darkness for people of color and other marginalized identities.

It’s become clear that the way and teachings of Jesus are inferior and disposable when political power is on the table. Evangelicals have exchanged the way of Jesus for a mythical past greatness where America was Christian. They live to reach backward to a time of greatness as fictional as Narnia, seeking a magical land where they are given power by God to dominate all others instead of simply admitting that they have created and perpetuated that power all by themselves…

They have ignored present demographics that prove that “American” does not mean “white,” because if they acknowledged the full humanity of people of color, they would have to reckon with historical slavery and genocide, and the present-day caging of children and police brutality.

They have ignored the calls of Jesus to make ourselves humble and small, to love our enemies and to choose the non-violent way because if they were to acknowledge these teachings, they would have to reject the militarism (and its subsequent budget), their obsession with guns and make reparations for our historical globalized violence.

A group that cannot decide between God and country will always inevitably choose the country that blesses them with tangible and violent power, and they will settle with attributing that to God. The power that Jesus offers seems to be much less politically sexy. Jesus asks us to rely on the power of gentleness, and inclusion, and reject the fear of the “other” in the spirit of greater life for all, not the protection of power and authority of some.

Jesus never asked Christians to make a Christian nation. On the contrary, He asked them to pledge their allegiance to His kingdom. The notion of prioritizing country is inherently unChristian and it has become exceedingly clear that while evangelicals claim to want greatness in the name of God, that they will settle for creating a pseudo-theocracy in the image and name of President Trump.

Evangelicals continuously use the Bible in order to oppress others and have called it greatness. This community will never make America great because it cannot see its own hypocrisy. Evangelicals will sacrifice every word of Jesus in order to see their political ends met.

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Cash: The Tie That Binds Christians To The GOP

Great article in HuffPo.

Again, it’s not that there’s anything inherently evil about giving money to ministries, but that all changes when the ministries enter into a shift in emphasis in order to secure those types of contributions in the first place. It’s within this hegemony that the politics of the wealthy influence the politics of the church, because the more they have to give, the thinking goes, the more we will benefit from their largess. And so the church courts those with wealth, and a selfish thread gets woven into its message of salvation in the form of a prosperity message that seems to apply to every believer. However, the Biblical concept of prosperity is that no one among us would be poor, not that every one among us would be rich, and this is one of the most pressing differences between mainline Christian denominations and the evangelicals…

While so-called experts – likely with ulterior motives – have identified Scriptural justifications for God wanting us all to prosper, even a cursory study of the financial system that God gave the Israelites through Moses (Deuteronomy 15) includes clever governors that couldn’t be gamed by those seeking exorbitant wealth. It’s not so much that the system was designed to prevent avarice as it was designed to keep people from entering into poverty, an idea that is close to God’s heart, as evidenced time and again throughout the Bible. “He pleaded the cause of the poor and the afflicted,” Jeremiah prophesied to the unrighteous King Shallum about his righteous father, King Josiah, “and then it was well with him. Is this not what it means to know me, saith the Lord?” What we are witnessing today is nothing short of a breathtaking evil being perpetrated on people of lesser means by mislead people in the name of Jesus…

Each of us needs to stand in front of the mirror and look into the eyes of our reflection. We need to stare deeply into our own souls and ask ourselves a simple question. Why did Christ die for me? Was it so that my living conditions in this life would be better than most? Or was it so that I could use what I’ve been given to help lift others up?

Read the article in its entirety here.

 

 

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Why Evangelical Christians Can’t Get Enough of Trump?

A thoughtful Guardian article exploring the unholy alliance between Trump and the American evangelical community. Written by a former Christian who understands the need for certain Christians to feel persecuted. Interesting theory.

But beyond the pragmatism and the eagerness to forgive things like “locker-room talk”, I believe that evangelicals recognize a fellow outsider in Trump, someone not only unafraid to shake things up and offend people, but actively goes out of his way to do it…

Jesus once said: “Blessed are you when they revile and persecute you, and say all kinds of evil against you falsely for My sake. Rejoice and be exceedingly glad, for great is your reward in heaven.” So I went out of my way to piss people off – telling the goth kids they were prisoners of Satan’s lies, handing anti-abortion literature to the “loose” girls, and forcing science class to run late while I debated evolution with the teacher…

After nearly eight months in office, it’s becoming clear that many of Trump’s actions are not ideologically based, but designed to inspire maximum outrage from climate-scientists, academics, feminists, LGBTQ rights activists – pretty much every demographic that evangelicals hate. Whether he’s banning transgender soldiers from serving in the military, pardoning a vigilante sheriff, or refusing to properly distance himself from white supremacists, it’s not about the act itself, it’s about the negative reaction he gets from liberals.

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